How to de-cob your corn

All you need is a deep bowl or pot and a sharp knife to make cutting your corn off the cob a breeze. Of course, a shallow bowl or plate is an option if you like cleaning up bits of corn kernal and a spray of corn juice (really, corn juice?).

First husk the corn and brush off all the silks.

Hold the ear upright with the end resting in the bottom of the bowl. Position your sharp knife at the top of the ear run it straight down the length of the ear to cut off the kernals.

 

You'll get a feel for how deep to cut in order to get all the good part but leave the cob. If you're like me, you don't mind leaving a little bit of the good part so you can enjoy gnawing the rest off the cob before it goes into the compost.

Turn the cob and continue until you've stripped the ear of all kernals. Now you have delicious sweet corn to freeze for the winter, sitr fry with onions and peppers or add to the delicious corn-tomato-cucumber-peach salad/salsa that I love.

Enjoy!

Tip: Dried Tomatoes

Pour a tablespoon of wine or balsamic vinegar over tomatoes, cover and let stand 30 minutes. Add herbs and bay leaf Cover tomatoes with oil; stir or tap jar to remove any trapped air. Store in fridge use within 6 weeks. Additions Add feta cheese, olives…serve with pasta, salads or serve as an appetizer with a...Read more

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